DragonCon Shopping – Posters and Pop

The first two times we went to the dealers building, I just window shopped and bought a few items for friends and family. On Monday morning, on our way out of town, we hit the dealers building for some lightning shopping. Having only a little over an hour, I shamelessly abandoned my wife, friend, and child, to find some loot.

Vincent Price posters

 

I picked up some 11″x17″ Vincent Price posters for the wall. These will join my 11×17 Theater of Blood and my full-size original The Last Man on Earth poster (Thanks as always, Maya!).

Universal Frankenstein

 

I also picked up a couple Universal Frankenstein posters.

Mummy poster

 

Then I rounded it out with Hammer’s The Mummy poster and one of the first Lovecraft adaptations, The Dunwich Horror. The Haunted Palace (see Vincent Price above) is advertised as an Edgar Allan Poe picture but is actually based on a Lovecraft story with a Poe poem tacked on to the beginning and end.

Pennywise

 

Finally, since my wife and friends bought me a ton of Funko Pop! figures for my birthday, I couldn’t resist this one of Pennywise from Stephen King’s IT. Even the cuteness looks creepy.

P.S. They all float down here…..

Warner Archive Final Report

WB Archive Instant

The Warner Instant Archive FREE trial is a great deal. Despite some technical issues, there is a lot to like here if you like movies from the 20s-80s (fans of more modern fare need not apply). The Roku setup is simple though you must follow the instructions on Warner’s website to add the private channel.

Roku

Sadly this does not mean the channel itself is a good deal. Unless you are a devout cinephile, you can probably blow through all the content you want to see on Warner Archive during the trial. Price after that is $9.99 a month. I can imagine revisiting this in a year as Warner has an extensive back catalog that is much larger than their Warner Instant Archive.

Man from UNCLE

They do have a number of television shows available that I did not sample. The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Cheyenne, The Jimmy Stewart Show, Hawaiian eye, Jericho (1966), 77 Sunset Strip, and The Adventures of Superman are all on tap here. Their currently most popular movies are (strangely in alphabetic order) Attack of the 50 ft. Woman, Bachelor in Paradise, The Carey Treatment, Give a Girl a Break, Harper, Kansas City Bomber, Keeper of the Flame, Lone Star, Madame Satan, The Mayor of Hell, The Prize, The Racket, A Slight Case of Murder, Strange Cargo, What’s Up, Doc?.

If you do try Warner Instant Archive, do watch Time After Time, a very entertaining story of H.G. Wells tracking Jack the Ripper.

The Mummy

The Mummy (1959) – “In the 1890s a team of British archaeologists discover the untouched tomb of Princess Ananka but accidentally bring the mummified body of her High Priest back to life. Three years later back in England a follower of the same Egyptian religion unleashes the mummy to exact grisly revenge on the despoilers of the sacred past.

I own this Peter Cushing/Christopher Lee classic on DVD but Warner Archive has it in HD. I watched it and, if you have the bandwidth, it does look much prettier. They also have Curse of Frankenstein and Horror of Dracula in HD.

The Mummy – Classic Horror Week

The Mummy is currently available on instant Netflix.

The Mummy (1932)

“When British archaeologists uncover the ancient sarcophagus of a mummified Egyptian priest (Boris Karloff), they foolishly ignore its warning not to open the box, and the mummy is brought back to life. Taking the form of a modern Egyptian, he quickly begins his quest to resurrect the soul of his love, which he believes has been reincarnated in a modern woman (Zita Johann). Noted German cinematographer Karl Freund makes his directing debut.”

“He went for a little walk! You should have seen his face! “

The Mummy – a story of undying love, or stalking as we call it in the real world. Netflix’s instant play of The Mummy has a better picture quality than my Mummy DVD from the Legacy box.

Karl Freund finally gets out from behind the camera and directs here. His direction is good – there’s a wonderful scene at the beginning where a character goes mad at seeing the Mummy come to life (yes overacted as was the stagey style of the time) and the camera tracks over to watch the last bits of bandage go out the door. There are many nicely filmed spots like that but there are at least as many that are static stage play setups.

King Tut’s tomb and the rumored curse were very popular at the time so sets are crammed with as much Egyptian bric-a-brac as possible. Jack Pierce’s makeup jobs on the Mummy (only briefly seen) and Ardath Bey are fabulous and make the film worth watching by themselves. It took Pierce eight hours each day to do Karloff’s makeup.

Boris Karloff dominates every scene he is in, as is to be expected. He is absolutely riveting whether he is expressing his love for Helen or calmly threatening the archaeologists. Zita Johann is fascinating as Helen. In spite of being only 28, Zita appeared in only a handful of films after The Mummy.

The movie bears a remarkable resemblance to the previous year’s Dracula – the same piece of music opens both films, the wise benevolent character is played by Edward Van Sloan in both films, David Manners plays the young lead in both films, the stories are quite similar and Karl Freund also helped direct Dracula. While this movie is wonderful, the mummy per se is hardly featured at all. Conversely the four sequels (five if you count the Abbott & Costello one)¬†feature much more of the titular mummy but are a big step down in quality – they do beg the question of why can’t you just outrun him?

People Watch: Look for the wonderful character actor Noble Johnson in a bit part as the Nubian. While he was often given bit parts, a frequent problem for African-American actors through the 1960s, Noble did get to play the native chief in King Kong and Son of Kong. Also due to the magic of black and white filming, he got to play native Americans, Latinos, Arabs, even the devil himself in Dante’s Inferno (1935).

Sequel-itis: The titular Mummy changes from Imhotep to Kharis and would go on to appear in The Mummy’s Hand, The Mummy’s Tomb, The Mummy’s Ghost, and The Mummy’ Curse. Tomb, Ghost and Curse all feature Lon Chaney Jr. as Kharis. As usual the Universal series was finished off in Abbott & Costello Meet the Mummy (1950).

The Mummy

Well it wouldn’t be October without covering one of Boris Karloff’s wonderful movies. Luckily Netflix has several available for instant play.

The Mummy

WATCH: The Mummy (1932) – “When British archaeologists uncover the ancient sarcophagus of a mummified Egyptian priest (Boris Karloff), they foolishly ignore its warning not to open the box, and the mummy is brought back to life. Taking the form of a modern Egyptian, he quickly begins his quest to resurrect the soul of his love, which he believes has been reincarnated in a modern woman (Zita Johann). Noted German cinematographer Karl Freund makes his directing debut.”

The Mummy – a story of undying love or stalking as we call it in the real world. Netflix’s instant play of The Mummy has a better picture quality than my Mummy DVD from the Legacy box. Karl Freund’s direction is good – there’s a wonderful scene at the beginning where a character goes mad at seeing the Mummy come to life (yes overacted as was the stagey style of the time) and the camera tracks over to watch the last bits of bandage go out the door. There are many nicely filmed spots like that but there are at least as many that are static stage play setups. Sets are crammed with as much Egyptian bric-a-brac as possible. Jack Pierce’s makeup jobs on the Mummy (only briefly seen) and Ardath Bey are fabulous. Boris Karloff dominates every scene he is in as is to be expected. The movie bears a remarkable resemblance to the previous year’s Dracula – the same piece of music opens both films, the wise benevolent character is played by Edward Van Sloan in both films, David Manners plays the young lead in both films, the stories are quite similar and Karl Freund also helped direct Dracula. While this movie is wonderful, the mummy per se is hardly featured at all. Conversely the four sequels (five if you count the Abbott & Costello one)¬†feature much more of the titular mummy but are a big step down in quality – they do beg the question of why can’t you just outrun him?

People watchers: look for the wonderful character actor Noble Johnson in a bit part as the Nubian.